Terms
Advertise   Support WW    Contact   
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Ameri-canna
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    926
    Status
    RacerX is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    3991 times
    While trying to get compliant with state and local mmj statutes and ordinances, I was unable to actively provide medical cannabis to my patients, which left me nursing a Blue Dream plant for almost a year without being able to flower it . After more than nine months of vegging, this is what she looked like:

    riot bd mother.jpg

    She was too big for my room and had to live between two lights because she doesn't fit under them, so I decided to air layer her top three feet to use as a new mother.

    Air layering is a form of propagation that elicits roots from a plant branch/stem while the while a branch/stem is very much a part of the "mother" plant. Once roots have formed, the rooted appendages are harvested and planted themselves as complete, new plants. Here is a typical air layered clone immediately after separation from the mother:

    air layer ex 1.jpg

    I air layer all my "clones." Air layering helps me manage my grow room population easily: None of the clones count as a plant until they're separated from the mother, and when I separate them, they already have a functional set of roots, so it takes almost no time for the clones to take up vigorous independent growth. I air layer Blue Dream branches between 12" and 18" in length, making the clones nicely sized when they flip into flower. The Blue Dream clones only need about six days to start vegging after being separated from the mother, so I save a lot of space and hassle by using this propagation method.

    As you'll see, air layering can be a very effective method of propagation, and it can be used to address some otherwise very inconvenient size problems - it's a perfect solution to plants that have exceeded their useful sizes. The nicest thing about using air layering to clone a new mother? You can continue to harvest clones off the stump while the new mother establishes her roots: Your grow continues uninterrupted, and you use the entire plant without wasting any part except the stump itself.

    I run two rooms, 7'x21'x6.5' (LxWxH) with five 1000 Lumatek adjustable ballasts and five CAP 8" Lumenairre hoods. Veg has two hoods, flower has three. Veg room:

    grow pic 1.jpg

    Back to the project.... I cut the big 6' Blue Dream into two plants. The top section was drafted as the new BD mother for my room, while the stump with its remaining branches served as my clone donor until the new mother was ready.

    Here's the large BD plant right before the separation. Note the tin foil tumor on the middle of the main stem:


    pre-surgery bd mother.jpg

    pre-surgery bd mother 2.jpg

    About three weeks prior to this pic, I had scraped away the outer layer of bark at the center of the tumor and slathered the wound with Clonex. I then packed moist soil (peat works well, too) around the wound and bandaged the whole thing with foil. Periodic checking let me know when the roots had developed to the point that they could support the new plant on their own.

    When the roots sufficiently developed, I severed the top of the plant just below the tin-foil tumor:

    separated from mother.jpg

    This is what the new roots looked like underneath the foil tumor. In the interest of full disclosure, this pic comes from an Oceanside Purple Paki re-mothering, not the Blue Dream otherwise featured here:

    post surgery roots 1.jpg

    post surgery roots 2.jpg

    This is what was left of the stump:

    stump.jpg

    stump 2.jpg

    stump 3.jpg

    As you can see, a fair number of branches and a lot of foliage were left on the stump. This material provided clones for another two grow cycles while the new mother settled into her new home.

    Finally, the new mother (in a 7 gallon pot!):

    new mother.jpg

    And that, my friends, is how to make a new mother out of a six-foot Blue Dream!
    Last edited by Dublinskunkfiend; 08-13-2012 at 09:27 PM.

  2. #2
    Ameri-canna
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    926
    Status
    RacerX is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    3991 times
    Does anyone know how I can resize these pix? I wanted to insert full-sized pix, not thumbs. Any help would be appreciated.

  3. #3
    Is it 420 Yet?
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    behind you
    Posts
    521
    Status
    freegrow is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    2606 times
    good info brother !!



    peace and I have been lernt
    freegrow
    MY HONOR IS MY LIFE

    “The most tragic thing in the world is a man of genius who is not a man of honor.”

  4. #4
    Ameri-canna
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    926
    Status
    RacerX is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    3991 times
    The new mother at two weeks:

    new mother at two weeks.jpg

    That leaves the stump....

    I started a new set of air layers on the stump within the next week. As the air layers began to root, the plant continued to grow. In the pix below, the air layers are nearly ready for harvest. The foil "tumors" containing the new clone's roots are discernible (with some difficulty) on the branches:

    stumpys end.jpg

    stumpys end2.jpg

    Cutting:

    cutting1.jpg

    cutting2.jpg

    Leftovers:

    leftovers1.jpg

    leftovers2.jpg

    After cutting, I harden the clones off under a plastic sheet (home-style humidome). I keep them totally enclosed for three days under indirect light, and then partially enclosed for another two. After removing them from the home-made humidome, I veg them under indirect light for 24 hours, and then under the HIDs for four-five days.

    humidome.jpg

    Using this cloning method requires me to keep larger "mother" plants than I would otherwise need.

    grow 2.jpg

    grow 3.jpg
    Last edited by Dublinskunkfiend; 08-13-2012 at 09:31 PM.

  5. #5
    Weed Watcher
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    .
    Posts
    6,699
    Status
    Dublinskunkfiend is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    Belize
    Liked
    12822 times
    RX,

    thanks for the knowledge.

    These methods are savage, for anyone having plant issues.

    peace,

    DSF.

  6. #6
    ground up
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    189
    Status
    builtaforest is offline
    Liked
    1077 times
    Really cool

    Outside of reading in marijuana botany

    Never seen actually done

    Kudos

  7. #7
    Ameri-canna
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    926
    Status
    RacerX is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    3991 times
    Air layering is a remarkable process. If you find seed germination compelling, this technique will be right up your alley.

    A few tips:
    1. The soil/peat bandage needs to be kept moist. I use a 1ml/gal Clonex-water solution to moisten the medium until I see roots, and then I switch to Roots Exceluratur/water solution mixed at 2.2 ml /gal.

    2. If you air layer larger branches, you can headstart your lollipop (if you use that technique) on your prospective cutting. I believe early lollipopping reduces stress post-separation and encourages a quick transition to the new substrate. I support my belief by rationalizing that the severely pruned foliage of a lollipop would seem to impose a substantially lesser demand on an infant root system than unpruned foliage.

    3. Just as with any propagation technique, this technique may fail on occasion, but incidents of failure decrease with experience and are minimized by cleanliness. Failure in my experience has meant no more than an unrooted air layer - I've never had a plant die from a bad air layer. The technique can always be repeated at a different point on an intended cutting.

    4. Cool temps affect air layering in the same way they affect any root growth: They retard growth. I usually add a few weeks to my expected rooting times as winter lays in, and then propagate accordingly. As winter gasps its dying breaths, my propagation times shorten, and I have to revise my grow schedules to re-accommodate the quicker rooting times. Note, too, that different strains will root at different speeds. Riot's blue dream roots in six or seven days. BOG's Sour Bubble takes three to four weeks. Trial and error will reveal your plant's preferences.

  8. #8
    Weed Watcher
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Out of the Blue & Teetering on the Point of No Return
    Posts
    628
    Status
    Donnybrook is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    1740 times
    Quote Originally Posted by RacerX View Post
    Air layering is a remarkable process. If you find seed germination compelling, this technique will be right up your alley.

    A few tips:
    1. The soil/peat bandage needs to be kept moist. I use a 1ml/gal Clonex-water solution to moisten the medium until I see roots, and then I switch to Roots Exceluratur/water solution mixed at 2.2 ml /gal.

    2. If you air layer larger branches, you can headstart your lollipop (if you use that technique) on your prospective cutting. I believe early lollipopping reduces stress post-separation and encourages a quick transition to the new substrate. I support my belief by rationalizing that the severely pruned foliage of a lollipop would seem to impose a substantially lesser demand on an infant root system than unpruned foliage.

    3. Just as with any propagation technique, this technique may fail on occasion, but incidents of failure decrease with experience and are minimized by cleanliness. Failure in my experience has meant no more than an unrooted air layer - I've never had a plant die from a bad air layer. The technique can always be repeated at a different point on an intended cutting.

    4. Cool temps affect air layering in the same way they affect any root growth: They retard growth. I usually add a few weeks to my expected rooting times as winter lays in, and then propagate accordingly. As winter gasps its dying breaths, my propagation times shorten, and I have to revise my grow schedules to re-accommodate the quicker rooting times. Note, too, that different strains will root at different speeds. Riot's blue dream roots in six or seven days. BOG's Sour Bubble takes three to four weeks. Trial and error will reveal your plant's preferences.
    Thanks for the Pictorial Post & How-Too on Air Cloning Rx ,

    I have Air-Cloned a 4-5 times over the last 2 yrs & it works Brilliantly with great grow results of the air cloned cuttings takin off much faster with that extra head-start . Ti's a Great way ta keep within the numbers especially when ya find that Keeper Pheno ,,,
    Póg mo bán Irish thóin !

    Is gairid ár gcairt ar an saol seo ,,,

    Sláinte !

    "This is one race of people for whom psychoanalysis is of no use whatsoever."
    Sigmund Freud about the Irish

    Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist.
    George Carlin




  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    138
    Status
    JadeDragon is offline
    Liked
    654 times
    Looking forward to giving this a go as it just might suit my needs...... amazes me each day why I put off growing indoors. JD

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Its round on the ends and high in the middle
    Posts
    22
    Status
    LifeGenetics is offline
    Gender
    Male
    Country
    United States
    Liked
    111 times
    Well this could definitely come in handy, read about this technique before, but never tried it or seen it done before - great info!

    -Life


  
ALL content is for informational and educational purposes only,
and intended for visitors 18 Years of age and Older!


  Copyright ©2007-2019 WeedWatch.com Powered by Cannavelli Brands LLC. Sponsors | Link Partners   xhtml valid   Subscribe to Weed Watch Magazine's RSS Feed   
BACK TO TOP